stem cells Archives - Sophion
Sophion-hiPSC-derived-cell-lines

Latest advances in stem cell recordings on APC reviewed

A Sophion authored pluripotent stem cells and APC review paper shows the much-vaunted use of hiPSC in biomedical research is drawing closer to the promise they hold for safety pharmacology, drug discovery, and personalized medicine.

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Research scientist Kadla Røskva Rosholm, Ph.D., and colleagues at Sophion Bioscience, in conjunction with co-authors Prof. Niels Voigt and scientist Fitzwilliam Seibertz of the University of Göttingen have written a wide-ranging review of techniques and applications of hiPSC, developments driven by high-throughput APC.

Sophion-hiPSC-CM-current-clamp

This figure illustrates paced action potentials in 10 individual hiPSC-cardiomyocyte current clamp recordings from a single measurement QPlate. The expanded action potential shows typical AP characterization measurements: threshold potential (Vt), peak potential (Vp), hyperpolarization potential (Vh), and action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90).

View the full, open access paper here

Webinar: Automated Patch Clamping and iPSC Part II

We now have our next webinar on Automated Patch Clamp and iPSC planned.

Drug discovery in neuroscience faces many unique challenges, including access to the central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier and complex biology and circuitry that is still being defined. In order to overcome these challenges to identify treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders, scientists need better preclinical data.

One requirement for improved preclinical data is a robust model system. Recent advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the creation of stem cells from patient skin or blood cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These patient-derived iPSCs can then be differentiated into neurons to model how a patient mutation causes changes in neuronal function compared with a healthy control neuron, followed by testing of therapeutics for reversal of these in vitro phenotypes. This strategy has already successfully transitioned from the bench to the clinic for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have recently used this technology to better understand the cellular and molecular consequences of loss of CDKL5 in iPSC-derived neurons.

With Sophion’s automated patch technology, we can begin to understand the functional changes taking place in neurons with loss of CDKL5 function. Together, these model systems and technologies can be used to screen for and identify novel therapeutic targets for neurodevelopmental disorders.

In this webinar, Elizabeth Buttermore from Boston Children’s Hospital and Kadla R Rosholm from Sophion will give a joint presentation titled: Cellular, molecular and electrophysiological characterization of CDKL5 deficiency disorder in iPSC-derived neurons.

Voltage- and current clamp on induced pluripotent cardiomyocytes with Qube 384

Action potentials are induced in both HL-1 mouse atrial cardiomyocytes and Axiogenesis Cor.4U iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

Voltage- and current clamp on induced pluripotent cardiomyocytes with Qube 384. Action potentials are induced in both HL-1 mouse atrial cardiomyocytes and Axiogenesis Cor.4U iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Qube can combine voltage clamp and current clamp in the same sweep for added experimental control. Click here to read more.