ion channels Archives - Sophion
Sophion-QPatch-Compact-Video-Tutorials

New video tutorials to help you get the best start with QPatch Compact

For our new users of QPatch Compact, we have produced five new video tutorials to help you get started with planar patch clamp experiments on QPatch Compact. Besides the new video tutorials, on the new QPatch Compact Support Site, you have access to safety instructions, user manual incl. test protocols, and troubleshooting guides.

Sophion read more

 

Sophion-Sussex-Drug-Discovery-Partnership

Sussex Drug Discovery Centre and Sophion Bioscience announce new strategic partnership

Sophion Bioscience has partnered closely with Sussex Drug Discovery Centre (SDDC), based at the University of Sussex, for many years. We are now looking forward to extending our partnership, providing SDDC with wider access to our automated patch clamp technology and knowledge.

For SDDC, this partnership will strengthen their potential for research collaborations with both academic and industrial partners. Their existing structural biology, drug discovery and ion channel expertise, together with core facilities such as Cryo-EM also available at the University, mean SDDC is now ideally placed to become a centre of excellence for ion channel research.

We want to support SDDC in training, education, and inspiring the next generation of ion channel drug discovery experts. Additionally, for Sophion Bioscience, the strategic partnership will allow us to expand our field support operations in the UK by welcoming our customers to the SDDC laboratory for application development and demonstrations.

We look forward to providing even better and faster customer service to our UK automated patch clamp users, working dedicated to accelerating and pioneering ion channel research.Sophion-Sussex-Drug-Discovery-Partnership-Sarah-Lilley

 

Would you like to book a meeting with our application specialist at SDDC?

Please contact Sarah Lilley directly or you can book a demonstration in one of our laboratories in Copenhagen, Denmark, Boston, US, and Tokyo, Japan here: https://sophion.com/about/contact-info/

 

Safety pharmacology with aging population Sophion paper

Sophion-authored paper addresses the challenge of safety pharmacology in the elderly

Despite the looming problems that a growing elderly population causes drug discovery, limited, concrete solutions have been offered to address medicinal developments for the elderly. This threatens to engulf societies across the world.

In a thought-provoking review, ex-Pfizer safety pharmacology expert Bernard Fermini and Sophion scientist Damian Bell have called on the drug discovery community to open discussions and act to develop and implement adequate, robust, and safe testing of medicines for the ageing demographic.

We have made the review open access (no paywall); read the paper here.

Sophion-hiPSC-derived-cell-lines

Latest advances in stem cell recordings on APC reviewed

A Sophion authored pluripotent stem cells and APC review paper shows the much-vaunted use of hiPSC in biomedical research is drawing closer to the promise they hold for safety pharmacology, drug discovery, and personalized medicine.

Sophion read more

Research scientist Kadla Røskva Rosholm, Ph.D., and colleagues at Sophion Bioscience, in conjunction with co-authors Prof. Niels Voigt and scientist Fitzwilliam Seibertz of the University of Göttingen have written a wide-ranging review of techniques and applications of hiPSC, developments driven by high-throughput APC.

Sophion-hiPSC-CM-current-clamp

This figure illustrates paced action potentials in 10 individual hiPSC-cardiomyocyte current clamp recordings from a single measurement QPlate. The expanded action potential shows typical AP characterization measurements: threshold potential (Vt), peak potential (Vp), hyperpolarization potential (Vh), and action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90).

View the full, open access paper here

Sophion-hERG-current-traces-22-35C

Successful hERG recordings at 22°C and 35°C on QPatch II

When conducting your ion channel experiments a key environmental factor to consider is temperature. In this latest application report, the conductance, kinetics and pharmacology of the hERG ion channel current, a critical component of the cardiac action potential, were recorded at 22°C and 35°C.

Sophion read more

Like nearly all physiological processes, the activity and pharmacology of ion channels are highly dependent on temperature. Whether making ion channel recordings at mammalian body temperature (~35°C) or simply a consistent room temperature (RT), it is imperative to accurately control the temperature of your recordings. Even ‘simply’ ensuring all your recordings are not subject to the particular vagaries of the lab’s diurnal/seasonal micro-climate can be challenging. With temperature control, by setting the recording site to RT means accurately recording and reporting at 22°C, not the 18-27°C that we all know can be the real world lab RT.

If you want to learn more about temperature control on Sophion’s platforms, read more here

 

Sophion-alpha-cobratoxin

Collaborative paper on antibodies neutralizing cobratoxin published by the University of Toronto, Technical University of Denmark and Sophion Bioscience

Snakebite affects some of the poorest populations across the globe and was designated a neglected tropical disease (World Health Organisation, 2017).

In further seminal developments, Sophion has helped to develop and characterize the next generation of monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a key alpha-cobratoxin in the venom of the monocled cobra. The antibodies were discovered and developed via phage display by collaborators at the University of Toronto and the Technical University of Denmark. Their in vitro functional, neutralizing effect on the nicotinic acetyl choline receptor (nAChR) ion channel was determined on QPatch II.

Find the paper published in Protein Science here

Collaborative paper on antibodies neutralizing cobratoxin

Assessment of the in vitro neutralization potency of the top two IgGs was performed via electrophysiological measurements using whole cell patch-clamp. The blockade of ACh-dependent currents by purified α-CTx was reversed by pre-incubation of the toxin with serial dilutions of blocking IgG. Signals were normalized to full response (in the absence of α-CTx and IgG).

Ion Channels and Cancer

Ion channels are critical signaling proteins in all of the main hallmarks of cancer – see image above. Indeed, Prof. Saverio Gentile of the University of Illinois, Chicago, has pithily defined this inextricable connection as ‘a channelopathy called cancer’.

 

Sophion are at the forefront of ion channel research supporting and collaborating with world-leading oncochannelopathy labs, including hosting presentations on their findings at our Ion Channel Modulation Symposia, User Meetings & webinars.

Links to recordings of these lectures are given below.

Ion Channels and Cancer

Prof. Annarosa Archangeli, ICMS 2017, ‘hERG Channels: From anti-targets to novel targets for cancer therapy’

Dr Luis Pardo, ICMS 2017, ‘Kv10.1 and the cell cycle: A two-way road’

Prof. Mustafa Djamgoz, ICMS 2019, ‘In vivo evidence for expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in cancer and potentiation of metastasis’

Prof. Saverio Gentile, User Meeting 2021, ‘Targeting potassium channels in cancer from cell signaling to precision medicine

Upcoming Networking Event hosted by BPS: A World of Opportunity: Ion Channels and Automated Patch-Clamping

We invite you to attend the Biophysical Society’s event: A World of Opportunity: Ion Channels and Automated Patch-Clamping.”

Hear from accomplished speakers with experience working in pharma, academia, and biotechnology cover topics, including why they chose a career working with ion channels, the transition from academia to industry, profound discoveries as a result of their work, and where they see the field moving towards in the future.

 

Virtual User Meeting hosted by Sophion NA

We had a fantastic slate of speakers representing a variety of different industries each presenting their experiences with automated patch clamping. These presentations were followed by a live demo of the QPatch II 48 Automated Patch-Clamp Instrument with a focus on the Temperature Control features. A big thank you to Application Scientist Melanie Schupp and Product Manager Mads Korsgaard for staying late in Ballerup in order to run the demo.

The meeting was well attended with over 50 external participants representing 27 separate institutions. We were thrilled to see attendees from all over the globe, with many calling in from Europe and even Japan.

Thanks also go to all of our speakers who did a fantastic job presenting their research in an engaging way in this new virtual environment, Daniel who did an excellent job of running the program, Schuyler who set up the WebEx platform and managed the production, and Daniel, Sung, and Weifeng for recruiting such a good group of speakers both from the industry as well as academia.

​​​The one thing we will need to work on for our next virtual User Meeting is to figure out how we can get the participants a round of Lord Hobo beer for the annual User Meeting beer tasting event!

If you take a picture of the QR code below you will have the opportunity to open it and see the agenda and the speaker bios.

User Meeting (virtual) – hosted by Sophion NA

The event will be from 11:00 am to 3:30 pm on the 22nd of September, 2020.

Click here for instructions on how to access the Webinar

The agenda will be as follows:

11:00: Sophion Latest News – Mads Korsgaard, Global Product Manager, Sophion Bioscience

11:30: Jonathan Mann, Group Leader Biology Discovery, Charles River Laboratories

12:00: Alexander Komarov, Senior Research Investigator, Knopp Biosciences

12:30: Dang Dao, Research Director, Astellas Institute of Regenerative Medicine

01:00: Mark Estacion, Research Scientist, Yale University

01:30: Sam Goodchild, Senior Research Scientist, Xenon Pharmaceuticals

02:00: Jim Ellis, Chief Scientific Officer, Nocion Therapeutics

02:30: QPatch II with Temperature Control Demonstration – Sung Hoon Park, Application Scientist, Sophion Bioscience

The titles of the presentations will be announced shortly.

The meeting will be held as a webinar and if you want to join, please send an email to Schuyler King.

We are looking forward to having a successful virtual user meeting.

ICMS 2019, Boston, MA

We are thrilled to announce the dates for the very first US-based Ion Channel Modulation Symposium and look forward to seeing many ion channel professionals in October in Cambridge, MA (USA). Sophion has joined forces with Amgen and together we will host a two-day event packed with great talks and excellent networking opportunities.

The meeting will be held at the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge, MA.

See much more information about this meeting here.

Neuroscience 2019

This years’ SfN conference will take place in Chicago. Please drop by our booth #1608 and have an ion channel talk with our specialists.

We will keep you updated. In the meantime, you can read more about the meeting here.

Biophysical Society 63rd Annual Meeting 2019

As always at Biophysics we have a lot of activities going on. Please see below.

Friday, 1st March

Ion Channel Satellite Meeting

Sophion will be co-hosting the recurring satellite meeting, Drug Discovery for Ion Channels. Read more about the meeting here.

Saturday, 2nd March

Customer outing

Monday, 4th March

01:45 PM – Poster presentation:

Title: IPSC-derived motor neurons on the automated patch clamp platforms Qube and QPatch

Poster presenter: Application scientist Kadla Rosholm

Location: Exhibit Hall A-E – Poster board No.: B332

Abstract:

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can be differentiated into multiple cell types, including neurons and cardiomyocytes. This gives rise to a novel way of establishing human disease models, which in turn can be used for drug development in vitro. Ion channels represent highly attractive therapeutic targets in the nervous and the cardiovascular system, rendering electrophysiological studies of hiPSCs important for their usage in drug discovery. However, such studies have traditionally been limited by the labor-intensive and low-throughput nature of patch-clamp electrophysiology. Here we use our automated patch clamp systems Qube 384 and QPatch 48 in order to increase throughput and reduce timelines.
Our observations include channel expression versus time in culture, the pharmacological dissection of endogenous ion channels (e.g. Nav and Kv), identification of ligand-gated receptors, and recordings of action potentials using the current clamp feature. Also, we show the electrophysiology of a spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) model. The disease model for SMA was derived by mutations in the SMN1 gene and shows enhanced sodium channel activity but no shift in the normalized current-voltage relationship. ALS was here mimicked by a single point mutation in the superoxide dismutase 1 protein (SOD1), D90A, which had previously been identified in recessive, dominant and seemingly sporadic pedigrees. Cells carrying this point mutation displayed larger sodium currents, which eventually led to neurofilament aggregation, neurite degeneration and other phenotypes. We could confirm that the electrophysiological effect could be reversed by point mutation to D90D.

Our measurements validate the feasibility of measuring hiPSC ion channel currents using the APC platforms Qube and QPatch. Altogether, these results can facilitate evaluating the use of hiPSC for early drug development and in extension personal medicine.

Tuesday, 5th March

Sophion Seminar

9:30-11:00 AM – Sophion will be hosting a mini ion channel symposium in Room A at Baltimore conference center titled:

Electrophysiological characterization using automated patch clamp (QPatch and Qube) of hiPSC-derived neurological disease models, new automated patch clamp ion channel assays for CiPA cardiac safety testing (dynamic hERG and LQT3 late NaV1.5) and NaV1.7 drug discovery.

  • Marc Rogers (Metrion Bioscience): Milnes and late Nav1.5 for cardiac safety,
  • Bryan Moyer (Amgen): HTS drug discovery,
  • Kadla Rosholm (Sophion): hIPS neuronal disease models
  • Sarah Williams (Charles River): Adaptive online V½ estimation.

 

Poster presentation

01:45 PM – Poster presentation:

Title: Biophysical and pharmacological profiling of multiple voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes on QPatch II

Poster presenter: Application scientist Daniel Sauter

Location: Exhibit Hall A-E – Poster board No.: B285

Abstract:

Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. VGSC have been identified as excellent drug targets for treatment of pain, epilepsy and to other neurological disorders. Early compounds, however, were developed using empirical approaches. The identification of the molecular identity of VGSC in combination with technological advances, such as the automated patch clamp technique, provide the basis for a rational design of subtype-selective compounds.

To date, 9 functional mammalian isoforms (NaV1.1–1.9) have been described in the literature. The various subtypes differ in their expression pattern and exhibit distinct biophysical and pharmacological profiles. All have in common that they produce a transient inward current in response to membrane depolarization. During this process, the VGSC transitions from a closed to an open into an inactivated state. Interestingly, inhibitor compounds often exhibit different pharmacological profiles dependent upon the ion channel conformational state.

In the present study, the second generation QPatch (QPatch II; Sophion Bioscience) was used in combination with adaptive voltage protocols to investigate state-dependent inhibition of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and tetracaine on 8 different VGSC subtypes (NaV1.1-8). A first step was to determine the half-inactivation potential V½(inactivation) for each individual cell. This value was then used during the next steps as preconditioning pulse. Such an adaptive protocol allowed to determine IC50 values for both the closed and the inactivated state and reduce heterogeneity of the cells. Both IC50 values and biophysical parameters of the different subtypes align well with literature values.

Sophion User Meeting 2018 – Europe

Join us for a couple of days of great QPatch and Qube talks and good company

 

We are happy to invite you to our European Sophion User Meeting on 5th and 6th September 2018 and we are very pleased to announce that GSK in Stevenage kindly has offered to host the meeting this year.

We are preparing an interesting programme starting at noon on 5th September giving everyone a chance to travel to Stevenage in the morning. Wrap-up on 6th September just around lunchtime.

More information about the meeting will follow shortly.

Make sure to register for the meeting now as there are a limited number of seats.

ICMS2018 – thank you very much

We would like to thank you for participating at the 3rd Sophion Ion Channel Modulation Symposium in Cambridge last week. We truly appreciate that you took the time to attend and we hope you enjoyed yourselves as much as we did. A special thanks to our sponsors; Roche, MaxCyte, SB Drug Discovery, B’SYS, Charles River and Metrion for being part of ICMS2018. And last but not least a huge thanks to the speakers and the advisory board whom all contributed making the event a success. See you on 19th and 20th June next year.

Japanese Safety Pharmacology Society 9th Annual Meeting

We look forward to JSPS 9th annual meeting at The University of Tokyo, Yayoi Auditorium. You can find the entire program here.

You can meet with our ion channel experts at our booth #I at the Yayoi Auditorium. We are participating in the stamp rally.

Poster Presentation

On Saturday, 10th February between 11.30 AM and 12.30 PM, Dr. Kazuya Tsurudome will present a poster titled:

Voltage and current clamp recordings from human iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes on 384-channel automated patch-clamp system

Poster board no. 16

A list of all poster presented at JSPS can be found here.

Biophysics 2018 – here we come!

Time flies and soon BPS2018 will kick-off in San Francisco. We look forward to see you in San Francisco and hope that you will join us for the below events:

  • Satellite meeting – Friday, February 16th
  • Beer tasting and dining – Saturday, February 17th
  • Sophion Ion Channel meeting – Tuesday, February 20th
  • Poster presentation – Wednesday, February 21st

Read much more about each event here and make sure to sign up as the seats fill up quickly.

 

 

Sophion User Meeting, Boston – Save the date!

We are still working with the agenda but can, at this point, reveal that we have the pleasure of having Julie Klint, Lundbeck as one of several speakers. Julie will give a talk titled: Finding NaV1.1 activators – development and validation of a HTS suitable assay on the Qube. Also Noah Shuart from Xenon will be giving a talk.

Venue:

Hilton Boston/Woburn, 2 Forbes Rd. Woburn, MA 01801

Agenda:

April 10th

11.30 AM        Registration and lunch buffet

01.00 PM        Dr Kelly Gatfield, GSK: Tools for drug discovery: Early safety profiling and electrophysiology platforms for reducing attrition

01.30 PM        Dr Julie Klint, Lundbeck: Finding NaV1.1 activators – development and validation of a HTS suitable assay for the Qube 384

02.00 PM        Dr Noah Shuart, Xenon: Using Qube to assess IPSC neuronal sodium currents and studying mechanism of VSD4 binding ligands in heterologous expression systems

02.30 PM        Coffee break

03.00 PM        Bryan Koci, Eurofins: Optimization of cardiac safety pharmacology assay on the QPatch HT

03.30 PM        Dr Kris Kahlig, Praxis Precision Medicines: Benchmarking Eleclazine: Biophysical characterization of a cardiac late INa inhibitor

04.00 PM        Dr Mads P G Korsgaard, Sophion Bioscience A/S: Update on Qube 384

04.30 PM        Dr Daniel Sauter, Sophion Bioscience, Inc.: Light stimulated electrophysiology on Qube: applications for ligand-gated ion channels

05.30 PM        Wine tasting and tapas

 

April 11th

08.30 AM        Registration and coffee

09.00 AM        Dr Kathryn Henckels, Amgen: Development of a TMEM16A QPatch assay for assessing small molecule antagonists

09.30 AM        Dr Robert Petroski, Dart: Using the QPatch HTX for lead optimization of ligand-gated ion channels

10.00 AM        Coffee break

10.30 AM        Dr Haoyu Zeng, Merck: Systematic Performance Comparison between QPatch and PatchXpress for Cardiac Ion Channel Assays, and GLP-readiness Evaluation of QPatch for the CiPA Paradigm

11.00 AM        Dr Rasmus B Jacobsen, Sophion Bioscience A/S: QPatch, Past, Present and Future

11.30 AM        Lunch at hotel

01.00 PM        Open house at our new premises

05.00 PM        Wrap-up

Sponsor:

Use this link for room booking at Hilton, Woburn.

Local hotels:

Hilton Boston/Woburn
2 Forbes Road, Woburn, MA
Phone: +1 781-932-0999

Crowne Plaza Boston/Woburn
15 Middlesex Canal Park Drive, Woburn, MA
Phone: +1 781-935-8760

Comfort Inn Boston/Woburn
14 Hill St, Woburn, MA 01801
Phone: +1 781-933-5363

 

Biophysical Society 62nd Annual Meeting

We look forward to Biophysics 2018 where we will be doing a lot of activities:

First of all you can meet with our ion channel experts at our booth #518 at the Moscone Center.

Satellite Meeting

Friday, 16th February Sophion will be hosting the annually recurring satellite meeting, Drug Discovery for Ion Channels. 

See the agenda for the meeting here and make sure to sign up as the spaces are limited. 

Beer Tasting & Dinner

Saturday, 17th February we have the pleasure of inviting you to an informal evening of beer tasting, good food and great networking at the Bartlett Hall in San Francisco.

Make sure to sign up for this event here. Limited number of seats so be quick.

Ion Channel Mini Symposium

Tuesday, 20th February we will be having a short meeting at the conference center with the presentation title: Drug discovery and electrophysiological characterization using automated patch clamp (QPatch).

Venue: Room 6, Moscone Center, San Francisco – sign up here for the meeting:

10:30 – 11:00
Dr Damian Bell, Iontas Ltd.
Efficient ion channel cell line generation using MaxCyte electroporation and QPatch validation

11:00 – 11:30
Dr Daniel Sauter, Application Scientist, Sophion Bioscience A/S
Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (Cor.4U) characterized on an automated planar patch clamp set up (QPatch HT)

11:30 – 12:00
Dr Alan Wickenden, Scientific Director & Fellow, Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Janssen R&D, L.L.C
NaViGATING the long and winding road to new analgesics: Discovery of potent, selective, closed-state peptide Nav1.7 blockers

Refreshments will be served.

Poster Presentation

Wednesday, 21st February between 10.30 AM and 11.30 AM, Dr Daniel Sauter will present a poster titled:

Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (Cor.4U) characterized on an automated planar patch clamp setup (QPatch HT)

Poster board no. B301

See some of the great talks from ICMS 2017 in Cambridge

We have the pleasure of sharing with you some of the great talks from the Sophion Ion Channel Modulation Symposium which took place in Cambridge in June.

See the talks here.

Enjoy

 

Sophion Bioscience is acquired by Sophion CEO, management and investors

Sophion Bioscience has been acquired by Sophion CEO Thais T. Johansen, its management and a group of experienced investors.

Sophion was founded in 2000 as a spinoff from Neurosearch and have since the beginning been pioneering ion channel research and drug discovery. In 2004 Sophion launched the QPatch automated patch clamp solution, which still today is benchmark for advanced electrophysiology and cardiac safety in drug discovery. In 2013 Sophion Qube was launched taking automated patch clamp to the HTS space and taking automated patch clamping to a whole new level of usability. In between Sophion has continuously improved performance and capabilities and launched pioneering new features such as automated Rs compensation, automated current clamp, integrated cell preparation, etc.

Sophion was in 2011 acquired by Biolin Scientific Holding AB, a company owned by Swedish private equity firm Ratos AB.

Sophion CEO Thais Johansen states “Our new ownership structure and financial partners bring a long-term orientation and expertise in building a high-growth life science business. With this involvement, we are well-positioned to continue investing in innovation, technologies and people”.

Thais also said, “we will continue to build on the Sophion legacy with focus on quality, innovation and customer satisfaction” and continues “I am looking forward to talk to our partners over the next weeks to discuss these changes as well as discuss the many great news we have in pipeline”.

Sophion Bioscience employs approximately 60 people worldwide. It is headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark and has subsidiaries in Boston, Tokyo and Shanghai, as well as distributors in Japan, India and Korea. Sophion has an install base of 100+ automated patch clamp systems and presence in more than 75% of the TOP20 largest Pharma companies in the world.

Sophion Bioscience, Inc. is in the building

ICMS2017 – thanks everyone for contributing

Another great Sophion Ion Channel Modulation Symposium meeting at the amazing Clare College. Knowledge sharing, socializing and presentations of new discoveries in our field from the top notch researchers from academia and pharma industry. …. and good food and beer not to mention. Great way to spend a week. ICMS2018 already in pipeline.

Safety Pharmacology Society annual meeting

Hope to see you at the annual Safety Pharmacology Meeting 2017 in Berlin. Meet us at booth #113 and speak with our ion channel experts on site.

When:  24th to 27th September

Venue: Maritim Hotel Berlin

Poster presentation (Poster #022)
Temperature effect on hERG channel pharmacology measured by using the Qube automated patch clamp system.

Abstract:

The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) function is important for cardiac repolarization and inhibition of the channel can prolong the cardiac action potential, which give increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias including torsade des points (TdP). Therefore, In vitro evaluations of the compound effects is performed on the hERG channel routinely in drug development projects to detect potential arrhythmic side-effects.

Usually these compound measurements are carried out at ambient temperatures. Previously it has been shown that the potency for many compounds have been underestimated when compared to near physiological temperature tests. Therefore, a temperature controlled measuring environment is beneficial when testing compounds for the aims as mentioned here.

Until recently, the only possibility to test compound potency under voltage control conditions has been the manual patch clamp technique. Now automated patch clamp instruments with temperature control have come available making it possible to perform up to 384 parallel recordings at controlled temperatures ranging from 18°C and above.

Here we used an automated patch clamp system, Qube, to study the effect of temperature on concentration response relationships on a panel of compounds known to block the hERG channel. Qube has a temperature controlled test environment and in these studies, we show that temperature merits being taken into consideration when evaluating for hERG potency.

 

 

Neuroscience

See you at Neuroscience 2017, the world’s largest neuroscience conference for scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. You can find us at booth #823 where we look forward to meet you for an ion channel talk.

Venue:  Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, DC